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A pot filled with the veal ossobuco milanese ready to be served.

Veal Ossobuco Milanese

This is an uncomplicated, but exquisite dish belonging to a revered Milanese tradition. Slow braising, a good homemade broth and a bit of experience are all you need to make a marvel out of these simple ingredients.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 (3-inch-thick) veal shanks, a bit more than 1 pound each
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 ounces all-purpose flour
  • 3 ounces butter (3/4 stick)
  • 1 (2-ounce) slice DeLallo Pancetta, cut into small cubes
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, finely chopped
  • 1 (14-ounce) can DeLallo Imported Italian Crushed Tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 cups homemade or store bought stock (veal, beef or chicken)
  • Gremolada:
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

DIRECTIONS

  1. With a sharp knife, make two vertical cuts in the thick skin that surrounds each ossobuco to prevent the meat from shrinking. Tie up each piece separately with kitchen string—very simply forming a cross—in order to keep the meat together. Season the shanks all over with salt and pepper. Lightly flour each ossobuco on both sides.
  2. In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the pancetta and cook until brown. Remove the pancetta and set aside. Place the veal shanks in the pan, cook on high heat and brown the meat well on all sides. Remove the veal and set aside.
  3. Turn the flame down to medium and add the onion, celery and carrot; gently braise for 8 minutes, until just softened. Return the pancetta to the pan and add the crushed tomatoes. Slowly add the wine and stock, Cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Place the shanks back into the sauce and reduce heat to a low simmer.
  4. The slow braising should take approximately 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until the meat is falling off the bone. Turn the meat repeatedly, adding some broth if the sauce gets too thick. Taste for salt and pepper half way through, add if needed. Remember to frequently mix the sauce with a wooden spoon, and baste the meat occasionally.
  5. To make the gremolada, loosely mix parsley, lemon and garlic. Once the veal is fully cooked, place a bit of gremolada inside each hole, where the marrow has almost completely dissolved. Serve this dish with Risotto Milanese.

Veal Ossobuco Milanese

This is an uncomplicated, but exquisite dish belonging to a revered Milanese tradition. Slow braising, a good homemade broth and a bit of experience are all you need to make a marvel out of these simple ingredients.